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Turns Out, Most Of Us Want To Save The World.

Turns Out, Most Of Us Want To Save The World.

The Facts

When Al “I invented the internet” Gore’s movie An Inconvenient Truth reached theatres in 2006, words like “sustainability” and “environmentalism” were not at the forefront of people’s minds. But since then, we have been overrun with natural disasters, pollution, plastic clogging our oceans, and rising sea levels.

Amid all of these signs of a changing earth, people have warmed up to the idea that corporate practices must change, and not stocking plastic straws is strong enough.

Spiker Insights

A recent Nielsen report finds that 81% of global respondents feel strongly that companies should help improve the environment. This growing desire for corporate accountability is most popular among millennials, but it’s attractive among older generations as well. 72% of Baby Boomers, and 65% of respondents who were 65 or older felt it was extremely important, or very important, that companies introduce initiatives to benefit the environment. The overall sentiment is that if we save the world, we are saving ourselves.

It’s obvious to me that marketers can’t stay silent, and we shouldn’t be afraid to try and effect change. This holiday season is the time to start, and let’s be the change.

Do Nothing Americans

Do Nothing Americans

The Facts

We have all heard and read how the American adult vacationer wants adventures, experiences, learning classes when taking a few days off from work. But according to a new survey by the Associated Press, what Americans really want to do while on vacation is: ABSOLUTELY NOTHING.

Spiker Insights

Three-fourths of respondents said resting and relaxing is very or extremely important to them when they go on vacation. And they don’t want to do nothing at home; they want to be some place special to do nothing.                   

Most Americans say staying home and doing nothing isn’t ideal. They want a change of scenery. More than half of those polled said relaxing at home doesn’t count as a real vacation. I can still remember my mother telling me back in 1967 when the family was on a nine-week trip across the West in a truck camper that it wasn’t a vacation for her − the cooking, cleaning, sharing the driving and etc. She just wanted me to know not to treat my future wife like a vacation slave. Thanks Mom.

Outdoor is Bigger Than Ever

Outdoor is Bigger Than Ever

The Facts

This old-school ad format is currently booming precisely because digital ads are so commonplace. Amid all the digital noise, it’s a guaranteed way to reach a broad swath of people. It’s getting so hard and expensive to reach a mass audience today because it’s unclear who is watching other more classic media channels like TV or who is clicking on Internet ads. And then there’s the issue of if it’s even a real human being doing the clicking.

Spiker Insights

We have long loved designing billboards at Spiker Communications. Next to logos, they are the most difficult media channel to design. Which is why so many billboards out there are simply terrible, boring and unreadable. Inexperienced designers spend their day looking at a computer screen for their work, and a lot of them can’t imagine the final design will be 14 feet by 26 feet. I once took a field trip with our designers and drove out to one of our billboard locations. As we approached, I heard the designer who designed the board we were now going to see gasp and say “Oh my God” as she saw her work out in the public. Best little field trip we ever planned.

Yes, digital is still the future of the business. But outdoor is growing because we are all looking to find customers outside of Internet silos. Billboards are also becoming more digital. Outdoor screens can broadcast a variety of advertising on the side of a single bus stop, meaning advertisers can try multiple campaigns or tailor their ads to specific events and time of day.

Put the Creative Projects in the Hands of Creative People

Put the Creative Projects in the Hands of Creative People

The Facts

The great Stan Lee died almost a month ago − the renowned comic book writer, creator of Marvel super heroes, and late in his life, actor in television and movies featuring his creations. Stan Lee hated to see an idle artist. He (like me and many others) felt that idle talent was bored talent and bored talent was easy to lose to the competition or to the client side.

Spiker Insights

Keeping agency talent busy was just one of the lessons I took from Lee’s example.  A second, but equally important, lesson was don’t censor talent. Lee felt that if you hired an artist to do a job, you let them do the job. Lee was known to have expressed: “It seems to me that if a person is doing something creatively, and he or she feels that’s the way it ought to be done, you’ve gotta let them do it.”

We’ve been in business for over 35 years and one of things I am most proud of is all the firms and talents that have spun off from us. Spotting, nurturing and developing talent is painful, as many of them leave for greener pastures or greater freedom.

Lee enjoyed being fairly hands off as a boss. But he strongly felt the best example for his people was a reminder to dream big. There’s no better way to motivate the best people.