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Get Emotional

Get Emotional

The Facts

By now we should all know that people tend to choose brands quickly, using their intuitive brain rather than rationally thinking this through with their deliberative brain. Most purchases in a grocery store for instance are made on instinct and habit. Mom bought Crest, Cheerios and Band Aids for you growing up, and you still use Crest, Cheerios and Band Aids today. Brand choices are driven primarily by emotion, feeling and consistent experiences.

Spiker Insights

People still don’t make brand choices based on logical arguments (as many in our industry still like to believe), rather the more you feel for a brand, the more likely you will be loyal to those brands. I’m a Disney guy. It never even occurs to me to consider Universal Studios. To me, Big Sky is the best ski resort in the country − been to Aspen and all the others, but prefer the runs and the attitude of Big Sky. It takes a strong credible reason for people to change their attitude toward a brand. If the favorable brand keeps building its brand’s emotional experiences with me, I don’t ever see me or anyone else change their brand preferences. So stay the course and build emotion into your marketing and don’t ever screw it up.

Celebrating Unity and Diversity?

Celebrating Unity and Diversity?

The Facts
You no doubt saw that Coca-Cola had one commercial associated with the big football game a week ago. And it only ran before the national anthem. Because, in their words, they aimed to bring people together to celebrate their differences. They felt that running it within the game, America’s divisive culture would take over and ruin the moment for their message of Unity and Diversity. It was Coke’s hope that the viewers would come together as a country to sing our national anthem in unison across this great land.

Spiker Insights
Who do they think they are kidding? A majority of the dissension in this country involves our national anthem with football players not standing or even being present on the field during the playing of the song. Also, a majority of Americans think the big game is an inappropriate place for advertisers to make political statements. We want to watch football and not be reminded of the government shut down or what the Washington rats are up to. And not to mention the hassles of getting all the food and beverage out on the table prior to the kickoff, and the last bathroom break till half time. It’s a busy time right before the playing of our national anthem. I think Coke tried to be too PC and missed out on its opportunity to be heard and noticed.